David’s Tea Buddha’s Blend

Nirvana. This is the state in which Buddha had reached when he was on his search for inner peace. This tea is inspired by Buddha’s calming nature and perseverance for peace.

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David’s Tea Baby Blue Tin

David’s Tea was offering a deal of receiving a free tin with a purchase of 100g of tea. Once I had saw this baby blue coloured tin, I had to buy some. I was also in the mood to try a new tea blend and the sales associate suggested Buddha’s Blend.

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Buddha’s Blend Close-Up View

This tea was a blend of both white and green tea. If you know it is a green tea,  you know immediately there was a soothing and calming aspect to it. It also has both jasmine pearls and white hibiscus blossoms. The white hibiscus blossoms bloom after being steeped.

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Blooming White Hibiscus Blossoms

The instructions recommend the user to steep the tea 2-3 minutes for both hot and cold. I like to steep mine for 6 minutes as I prefer my tea to be a bit stronger. I find the flavour is much too light if I steep it for the recommended amount of time. If you grew up drinking strong teas, I recommend steeping it for longer to really get the flavour. Any longer than 6 minutes, the tea becomes bitter.

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Once steeped, the tea leaves give off a yellowy lemony tint. The tea blend is absolutely beautiful and I feel so calm after a nice cup of Buddha’s Blend. I recommend trying this tea if you’re looking to try a new green tea. It’s not as bitter as regular green teas, as it is a mix of both white and green tea, but you still get the herbal benefits of one.

If you like my post about teas, please let me know. I would love to write more blogs about them. Thank you!

~Miss Happy Penguin

*Believe.inspire.love.dream.optimistic.*

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3 thoughts on “David’s Tea Buddha’s Blend

  1. Buddhism and tea have a long history together. Because of tea’s ability to help keep monks calm, focused, and awake during long bouts of meditation many monasteries had tea gardens. Zen Buddhist monks also played an important role in introducing tea to Japan.

    Liked by 1 person

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